Interviews

Interviews with Helen

Check out what Helen has to say about her work and the state of genre fiction.

“There’s a kind of magic to short stories. I love them, I really, genuinely love them. They’re these beautiful, compact worlds that you can explode without consequences.” feature interview at Nightmare Magazine with Kelly Link

Read the Full Article

“It’s much easier to take risks in short stories: risks in terms of form, in terms of content, in terms of plot. Short stories are innocuous. No one suspects them of very much – but it’s really the most radical form around. You can do so much in a short story, and you don’t have to justify it, there’s not the same weight of reality.” feature interview at This Is Horror

Read the Full Article

“. . . When I was a kid I genuinely thought everyone who wrote books had died a long time ago. Like the dinosaurs. I had never seen a writer. I figured people didn’t write books anymore.”  — Have Fluency in Ecclesiastical Latin, Will Travel, AngelaSlatter.com

Read the Full Interview

“. . . History is the ultimate horror novel. Everyone dies at the end.”  — “Hair Side, Flesh Side”: A Conversation with Helen Marshall, Burnable Books

Watch the Full Interview

“Art should scare us. Art should move us. Art should go too far.” feature interview at Weird Fiction Review with Adam Mills

Read the Full Article

 

“. . . Horror is a vast, amorphous, unwieldy sort of genre and lots of writers and doing lots of different things in it. But at the core of horror are many of the same sort of trends or tropes: a desire to punish transgression, the presence of monsters, innocence lost, and a certain culpability in our own downfall.”  — Interview by Michael Keyton, On Fiction Writing

Read the Full Interview

“. . . Art should move us. Art should scare us. Art should go too far.”  — Interview: Helen Marshall and the Weird, Weird Fiction Review

Read the Full Interview

“. . . I like the sense of being off-balance. Of breaking the rules. And horror as a “genre”—as something codified—tends to have a rather concrete set of rules for how to scare someone. But I find when you normalize the strange, then suddenly you can cast a new spotlight on what initially seems normal.”  — Hair Side, Flesh Side: An Interview with Helen Marshall, Lobster & Canary

Read the Full Interview

“. . . I think the macabre in Canadian fiction accomplishes what the macabre accomplishes in all fiction: it gives us a sense of our own mortality, of the body as something that will inevitably die. It reacquaints us with fear, and at the same time it enlivens us.”  — Interview with Helen Marshall, Speculating Canada: Canadian Horror, Science Fiction, and Fantasy.

Read the Full Interview

“. . . Short fiction is, I think, one of the hardest forms to write because it’s so compressed, so confrontational in many ways.”  — Q&A with Author Helen Marshall, http://www.suzanne-johnson.com

Read the Full Interview